Cognitive and Affective Risk and Protection in Psychosis (CARPP) in 22q11.2 Deletion (VCFS/DiGeorge) Syndrome

Why do we call this the CARPP study? (PDF) »

We are carrying out a new study that focuses on how thinking, feeling and the biology of stress interact to affect the risk of young people with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) to develop symptoms of psychotic thinking.   The study is funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health, which is one unit of the main organization that gives money for research in the USA. Dr. Tony J. Simon would like to invite your 12- to 18-year-old child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (VCFS/DiGeorge) syndrome or typically developing child to be part of the study.

Adolescents and young adults with chromosome 22q11.2DS are vulnerable to psychiatric illness ranging from mild anxiety to, in a small minority, schizophrenia. However, very little is known about what factors contribute to such symptoms.  This study will look at biological reactions to stress, anxiety levels, and how the mind and brain works to see if some of these factors influence the risk for or protection against signs of psychosis.

Young people who take part in the study will complete several tasks on a computer. During some of them, their brain activity will be painlessly recorded in our Electrophysiology Lab. We will also ask them to provide some saliva by chewing on a small swab like Q-tip at specific time points in the morning. They will also be asked to complete a clinical interview about how they have been feeling, thinking, and acting over the last couple of weeks.  This will enable skilled clinicians to measure any changes in thinking that indicate alterations in their understanding of reality. In addition, they will have pictures taken of their brain using an MRI machine and families will be provided a copy of this. MRI scans do not involve any radiation. All of the activities are safe, interesting, and painless. The young person's parent(s) or guardian(s) will also be asked to answer questions about how the child has been thinking, feeling, and acting. All testing is for research purposes only, it is at no cost to families, and includes gift certificates for your child as a thank you for participating. If needed, we have some funds to help you with travel and lodging for your trip to Sacramento. All personal and medical information is kept private and safe. If you and your child would like to take part we will answer all of your questions and give you more information. The actual study will be carried out over one to two days and will include breaks for meals, snacks and resting when needed.

If you would like to find out more about taking part in the study and help us learn about mind and brain development in young adults like your own, please contact our study coordinator at 916-703-0409 or email us at hs-22q@ucdavis.edu.

Complete the screening forms to be considered for participation in the study »

Social functioning in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

We are carrying out a new study to better understand the causes of the social impairment that is common among children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, also known as Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome) and children with ASD, who do not have a specific genetic condition. Dr. Kathryn McCabe, Dr. Kathy Angkustsiri and Dr. Tony J. Simon would like to invite your 6-12 year old child to participate in the study.

Many children with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) have difficulties with their social capabilities. This can have a negative impact on their intellectual development, academic achievement, mental health, as well as family dynamics and quality of life. We are interested in learning more about the similarities and differences in the social difficulties that many children with 22q11DS and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) display.

Children who take part in the study will be asked to attempt a collection of short computer tasks, puzzles and a clinical interview. Parent tasks will include some questionnaires about their child. The testing is for research purposes only. Children will receive a gift card as a thank-you for their time and effort. The study takes about 8 hours over 2 days, with regular breaks for lunch/snacks. If needed, we have some funds available to help you with travel costs to Sacramento and accommodation expenses.

If you would like to find out more about taking part in the study and help us learn about mind and brain development in children like your own, please contact our study coordinator at 916-703-0409 or email us at hs-22q@ucdavis.edu.