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February 2017arrow

Placenta provides time capsule for autism studies

February 21, 2017

In two recent studies, researchers at UC Davis have shown that the placenta can provide critical information about early changes to the intra-uterine environment that may influence fetal development and ultimately, children’s brains.

Language barriers may interfere with access to kidney transplantation

February 10, 2017

Language barriers may hinder U.S. kidney transplant candidates’ access to kidney transplantation, according to a new study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.  Led by a team from Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health and UC Davis Health, the research suggests that patients who primarily speak a language other than English may face disparities that keep them from completing their kidney transplant evaluations and, ultimately, from receiving a transplant.

Poverty and high neighborhood murder rates increase depression in older adults

February 9, 2017

Older adults who live in poor and violent urban neighborhoods are at greater risk for depression, a study by researchers from UC Davis, the University of Minnesota and other institutions published Jan. 23 in the journal Health & Place has found.

UC Davis study finds mold, bacterial contaminants in medical marijuana samples

February 7, 2017

UC Davis physician researchers have found that medical marijuana contains multiple bacterial and fungal pathogens that may cause serious and even fatal infections. They warn that smoking, vaping or inhaling aerosolized marijuana could pose a grave risk to patients, especially those with leukemia, lymphoma, AIDS or conditions requiring immune-suppressing therapies.

January 2017arrow

How maternal immune response to allergies may affect neurodevelopment

January 31, 2017

Researchers at UC Davis have published a study that illustrates how maternal immune activation could affect neurodevelopment in offspring.

Prior DUIs predict future criminal activity among firearm owners

January 30, 2017

Among individuals who legally purchased handguns in California, prior convictions for driving under the influence (DUI) and other alcohol-related crimes were associated with a substantial increase in risk for subsequent violent or firearm-related crime, according to a study published Jan. 30 in Injury Prevention by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program.

Faulty DNA error correction genes set stage for familial gastric cancer

January 19, 2017

A large team of researchers from UC Davis and several European and Latin American institutions have identified genetic variations that contribute to familial gastric cancer. These inherited mutations, which affect the PALB2, BRCA1 and RAD51C genes and have been implicated in other cancer types, impair a critical DNA repair mechanism called homologous recombination. These findings could improve preventive care, as well as provide targets for new therapies. The study was published last month in the journal Gastroenterology.

Many late-stage lung cancer patients do not get treatment

January 18, 2017

A national study by researchers at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that a significant number of lung cancer patients are not receiving treatment. Based on data between 1998 and 2012 from the National Cancer Database, 21 percent of patients (190,539) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) received no specific cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. Many of the untreated patients were women, elderly, minorities, low income and uninsured.

UC Davis Health welcomes Beijing medical equipment company

January 9, 2017

UC Davis Health has entered into an agreement with Top Grade Health Care to establish a translational research and development center to advance the treatment of patients with cancer.

December 2016arrow

UC Davis MIND Institute part of national study on video game-like therapy for ADHD

December 28, 2016

The UC Davis MIND Institute is participating in a nationwide ADHD study using a scientifically designed video game-like technology.

Shift in some teens' use and perceptions of marijuana after recreational marijuana is legalized

December 27, 2016

Marijuana use significantly increased and its perceived harm decreased among eighth- and 10th-graders in Washington state following enactment of recreational marijuana laws, according to a UC Davis and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health to be published online in JAMA Pediatrics. There was no change in use or perceived harm among 12th graders or among similar grades in Colorado.

Genomic sequencing illuminates recent Shigella outbreaks in California

December 22, 2016

In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers at UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015.

Study identifies who could benefit most from exercise as a depression treatment

December 21, 2016

Factors such as advanced age and greater aerobic capacity increase the likelihood that exercise will work as a treatment for depression in elderly patients, a recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has shown.

UC program excels at reducing hospital blood clots

December 15, 2016

Results of a UC-wide venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention program, led by Gregory Maynard, chief quality officer for UC Davis Medical Center, have shown a significant reduction in hospital-associated VTEs at all five participating UC hospitals, according to a recently released study authored by Maynard and published in the December 2016 issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Fragile X drug trial gets $11.5 million in NIH funding

December 15, 2016

The UC Davis MIND Institute and Rush University Medical Center have been awarded $11.5 million from the National Institutes of Health to test a new therapy designed to improve language learning for children fragile X syndrome. 

Hormonal contraception is safer than expected for women with diabetes

December 14, 2016

Strokes and heart attacks are rare for women with diabetes who use hormonal contraception, with the safest options being intrauterine devices (IUDs) and under-the-skin implants, new research published in Diabetes Care shows.

Genetics and environment combine to influence autism-associated genes

December 13, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that a well-known neurotoxin (PCB 95) and a chromosomal duplication (Dup15q) have a profound impact on DNA methylation, the epigenetic process that can influence gene activity. These cumulative genetic and environmental “hits” alter the epigenetic landscape during development, altering genes linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study was published in the journal Cell Reports.

Immunotherapy improves survival in late-stage lung cancer patients

December 12, 2016

A large trial by UC Davis professor David Gandara has found that the immunotherapy atezolizumab was superior to chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

Healthy weight only protects women from hot flashes during the early stages of menopause

December 6, 2016

Greater weight increases the likelihood of hot flashes and night sweats during early stages of the menopause transition but reduces those symptoms throughout menopause and beyond, new UC Davis research published in the journal Menopause shows.

November 2016arrow

Gram-negative bacteria may influence Alzheimer's disease pathology

November 29, 2016

For the first time, researchers have found higher levels of Gram-negative bacteria antigens in brain samples from late-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients. Compared to controls, patients with Alzheimer's had much higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and E coli K99 pili protein. In addition, The UC Davis team also found LPS molecules congregated with amyloid plaques, which have been linked to Alzheimer’s pathology and progression. The research was published today in the print edition of the journal Neurology.

Alarming health disparities could be prevented by breastfeeding

November 23, 2016

Black infants had over twice the deaths of whites attributable to lack of optimal breastfeeding, a new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics shows. Black infants also had over three times the rate of necrotizing enterocolitis, a devastating disease of preterm infants, attributable to suboptimal rates of feeding with their mother’s own milk.

Mobile health data may offer new pathways to better patient care

November 15, 2016

A UC Davis-led team has been awarded a $1.2 million grant from California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine (CIAPM) to explore the use of personalized mobile health data to improve chronic disease management and care.

October 2016arrow

Terminally ill cancer patients fare poorly after surgery

October 25, 2016

Patients with disseminated advanced cancer who undergo surgery are far more likely to endure long hospital stays and readmissions, referrals to extended care facilities and death, UC Davis researchers have found.

New grants help UC Davis researchers home in on Angelman syndrome treatment

October 20, 2016

Two UC Davis researchers have received grants totaling $1.6 million to advance their work to find an effective treatment for Angelman syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes seizures and sleep disturbances and inhibits language development.

Sexual pain in women after cancer is common, and too often ignored

October 20, 2016

Painful sex in women after cancer treatment is relatively common, often treatable and needs to be addressed by medical providers, a UC Davis oncologist and researcher suggests.

Neu5Gc in red meat and organs may pose a significant health hazard

October 19, 2016

Neu5Gc, a non-human sialic acid sugar molecule common in red meat that increases the risk of tumor formation in humans, is also prevalent in pig organs, with concentrations increasing as the organs are cooked, a study by researchers from the UC Davis School of Medicine and Xiamen University School of Medicine has found.

NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program Expands in California

October 13, 2016

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has named the California Precision Medicine Consortium as a regional medical center group in the national network of health care provider organizations that will implement the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program.

High sialic acid levels in organ meats may pose significant health hazard

October 12, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis and the Xiamen University School of Medicine have found that a dangerous family of molecules called sialic acids (SIAs) are prevalent in piglet organs, with concentrations increasing as the organs are cooked. Of particular concern, a SIA called Neu5Gc was prevalent in piglet spleens and lungs. SIAs have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The research was published in the Glycoconjugate Journal Sept. 9.

Preserving the power of antibiotics

October 6, 2016

Of the 10 million prescriptions for antibiotics that emergency department physicians in the U.S. write each year, many are prescribed for known viral infections such as acute bronchitis and upper respiratory infections, which do not respond to antibiotics. A one-year study at UC Davis Medical Center funded with a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and preserve the microbe-fighting power of antibiotics.  

30-day hospital readmission is a poor measure of quality

October 4, 2016

The 30-day window for hospital readmissions — used by the federal government to penalize hospitals believed to provide lower-quality care because patients return to the hospital following discharge — should be reduced to a week or less to more accurately measure factors within a hospital’s control, new research from UC Davis has found.

UC Davis surgeons enroll the first patient in an acute spinal cord injury study

October 3, 2016

Neurosurgeons at UC Davis Health System have enrolled the first patient in a study that will determine if a new investigational treatment can safely and effectively improve motor function following acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

September 2016arrow

Nancy Lane honored by national organization

September 30, 2016

Nancy Lane, endowed professor of medicine, rheumatology and aging, and director of the UC Davis Center for Musculoskeletal Health, has been honored by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) with its 2016 inaugural Steven M. Krane Award for her clinical research focused on osteoporosis and bone biology in patients with rheumatic diseases.

Breastfeeding saves mothers' lives, too

September 28, 2016

Breastfeeding as recommended — for a total of one year and exclusively for six months — could protect moms as well as their babies from premature death and serious diseases and save more than $4.3 billion in health care and related costs, according to a new study published online in Maternal & Child Nutrition.

Funding moves UC Davis scholars' research closer to the patient bedside

September 27, 2016

Preventing skin scarring with red light-emitting diodes and using small molecules in the breath to detect infections are just two of several innovative projects developed at UC Davis Health System that are moving closer to becoming new treatments and tools for improving patient care, thanks to the mentored research programs of the UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) and the Emergency Medicine K12 program. 

UC Davis joins large-scale effort to identify environmental influences on child health

September 26, 2016

UC Davis will receive $3.9 million from the National Institutes of Health to join the first phase of a seven-year initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes, or ECHO.

Lam obtains major federal grants

September 23, 2016

Kit Lam, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, has received two major cancer research grants totaling more than $3 million.

Gut pathogens thrive on body's tissue-repair mechanism

September 16, 2016

Why do some foodborne bacteria make us sick? A paper published Sept. 16 in the journal Science has found that pathogens in the intestinal tract cause harm because they benefit from immune system responses designed to repair the very damage to the intestinal lining caused by the bacteria in the first place.

Essential mouse genes could guide human precision medicine

September 14, 2016

About one-third of 1,751 genes studied in the first comprehensive survey of the mouse genome are essential to life, according to research by an international collaboration including the University of California, Davis, Mouse Biology Program. Mutations of these genes cause death at the embryo stage. Many of them have counterparts in the human genome, so understanding why these genes are so vital could help prioritize human genes for study.

NIH renews knockout mouse project

September 12, 2016

The University of California, Davis, has been awarded $29,290,259 from the National Institutes of Health under the next five-year phase of the Knockout Mouse Project. UC Davis is the lead organization in a consortium involving research partners at The Center for Phenogenomics in Toronto, Canada, the Childrens’ Hospital Oakland Research Institute and Charles River Laboratories in Wilmington, Mass.

Voices of patients and oncologists must be heard, study shows

September 9, 2016

Training oncologists and their patients to have high-quality discussions improves communication, but troubling gaps still exist between the two groups, according to a new study in JAMA Oncology.

Cognitive function tests reliable for people with intellectual disabilities, UC Davis research shows

September 6, 2016

Researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute have found that a battery of tests appears to have strong potential for measuring cognitive changes over time for people with intellectual disabilities. The work could open new doors to research into whether drugs and specialized educational programs or treatments can improve function in people with Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome and other causes of intellectual disabilities.

UC Davis K12 scholars funded for cancer research

September 6, 2016

The National Cancer Institute has again funded the K12 Paul Calabresi Clinical Oncology Training Grant to promote and sustain the development of young cancer scientists from diverse fields and from laboratories and clinics across both UC Davis campuses.

August 2016arrow

IPHI report shows impact of cancer screening in California over past 15 years

August 31, 2016

A new report from the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement (IPHI) shows the impact of cancer screening over the past 15 years, identifying areas where increased screening and other cancer-control efforts would save lives and significantly benefit population health.

Sertraline, brand named Zoloft, improves functioning in young children with fragile X

August 26, 2016

Treatment with sertraline may provide nominal but important improvements in cognition and social participation in very young children with fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the leading single-gene cause of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.

Lay educators help boost colorectal screening rates in Hmong

August 26, 2016

Hmong Americans are more likely to understand the importance of colorectal cancer screening and to get screened when they’re provided information by specially trained Hmong lay health educators, new research from UC Davis has found.

Specialized test detects bacterial infections in youngest infants with fever

August 23, 2016

Physicians from Children’s Hospital of Michigan, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children's Hospital, in collaboration with 19 other pediatric emergency departments around the country, have established a “proof of principle” for measuring patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression in the bloodstream that can enable clinicians to distinguish bacterial infections from other causes of fever in infants up to two months old.

Greenhalgh to lead study of burn shock treatment

August 12, 2016

The U.S. Department of Defense has awarded $2 million to David Greenhalgh, a UC Davis surgeon and national leader in treating burn injuries, for a study of the outcomes of a fluid resuscitation treatment for burn patients.

Study finds Hispanic men in California need more screening for colorectal cancer

August 11, 2016

Colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates in California have decreased markedly for men and women in all major racial-ethnic groups since 1990, except for Hispanic men. Colorectal cancer rates for Hispanic men have remained relatively the same, a disparity that can be improved by greater screening, a study of colorectal cancer trends from the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement (IPHI) finds. 

New grants help move innovative ideas to new discoveries

August 10, 2016

Two physician scientists received seed funding from the UC Davis Office of Research’s Science Translation and Innovative Research (STAIR) program to help them demonstrate proof-of-concept and commercial feasibility of their innovative technologies, which aim to address unmet market needs.

UC Davis scientists awarded $1 million grant for prostate cancer research

August 5, 2016

The Prostate Cancer Foundation and Movember, the global charity that has raised hundreds of millions for men’s health research and programs, have delivered $1 million to UC Davis prostate cancer researchers.

Alzheimer's Association issues $7 million challenge to scientists to speed drug discovery

August 2, 2016

Four cutting-edge studies, including one led by John Olichney, professor and neurologist at the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center, will each receive $1 million to advance current Alzheimer's research to the next stage of clinical trials. A unique, goal-driven competition offers an additional $3 million to the clinical trial that demonstrates the most promise for treating this devastating disease.

July 2016arrow

Hybrid treatment hunts down and kills leukemia cells

July 28, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis and Ionis Pharmaceuticals have developed a hybrid treatment that harnesses a monoclonal antibody to deliver antisense DNA to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells and that may lead to less toxic treatments for the disease.

2016-2017 MIND Institute Distinguished Lecturer Series starts Sept. 14

July 27, 2016

The UC Davis MIND Institute kicks off its 2016-2017 Distinguished Lecturer Series in September with an address by Robert H. Ring, associate professor at Drexel University in the College of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Physiology.

De Vere White to serve on prestigious NIH panel

July 26, 2016

Ralph de Vere White, who retired in June as director of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, has been named to a key committee at the National Institute of Health (NIH).

UC Davis scientists awarded grant for rare genetic disorder research

July 21, 2016

The state stem cell agency, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), today approved a $1.1 million grant to UC Davis for research aimed at developing a treatment for Angelman syndrome,  a rare, neurogenetic autism-spectrum disorder that occurs in one in 15,000 live births.

UC Davis researchers temporarily turn off brain area to better understand function

July 20, 2016

Capitalizing on experimental genetic techniques, researchers at UC Davis’ California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) have demonstrated that temporarily turning off an area of the brain changes patterns of activity across much of the remaining brain.

High quality MRIs without sedation are possible in severely affected children with autism

July 19, 2016

UC Davis researchers have found a way to get MRI images of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability without sedating them first using the principles of applied behavior analysis.

Historic data to aid in long-term study of ethnic disparities in brain health and dementia

July 14, 2016

Physical exams conducted from the 1960s through the 1980s will be revisited to evaluate risks and protective factors in early and midlife that could affect brain health and dementia diagnoses among a large, ethnically diverse group of seniors. The Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research will partner with the UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center for the study, which is funded with a five-year, $13 million grant from the National Institute on Aging.

Oncologists and cancer patients often differ in prognosis perceptions

July 14, 2016

Patients with stage III or IV cancer report far more optimistic expectations for survival than their oncologists thought they had communicated, according to new research published today in JAMA Oncology. Effective communication between doctors and their patients who could be nearing the end of their lives is crucial, according to the authors, since this is when quality-of-life decisions merge with discussions about treatment options.

New grant further solidifies UC Davis' leadership role in translational research

July 12, 2016

The UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) and the wide array of services that have supported innovative biomedical research and led to the development of new treatments for diseases during the past 10 years will continue, thanks to a $27.8 million grant from the National Center for Accelerating Translational Science and the ongoing support from the School of Medicine.

UC Davis scientists awarded grant for rare genetic disorder research

July 5, 2016

The London-based LouLou Foundation, in partnership with the Orphan Disease Center of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has awarded a grant to UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures Director Jan Nolta and one of the institute’s post-doctoral fellows, Kyle Fink, to study how Fink’s gene editing techniques might be used to treat a rare genetic disorder that hits children – mainly girls – at a very young age with difficult-to-control seizures and severe neuro-developmental impairment.

June 2016arrow

Beware of unapproved stem cell procedures

June 30, 2016

At least 351 companies across the United States are marketing unapproved stem cell procedures, according to a new study by a UC Davis stem cell researcher and a University of Minnesota bioethicist.

Study shows that some, but not all, premenstrual symptoms are linked with inflammation

June 23, 2016

Certain premenstrual symptoms, such as mood changes, breast pain and abdominal cramps, are linked with inflammation, but headache is not, according to new research from UC Davis Health System. Published in the current issue of the Journal of Women’s Health, the results suggest that anti-inflammatory medications may be appropriate for some but not all symptoms associated with menstruation.

"Digital neurotherapeutic" in development at the UC Davis MIND Institute

June 22, 2016

A UC Davis researcher has created a video game for children who experience cognitive impairments from genetic disorders with the hope that that it will improve their ability to mentally process information about space and time.

Nearly 10 million U.S. adults severely nearsighted

June 22, 2016

A new study by investigators at the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Genentech, the National Institutes of Health and UC Davis Eye Center has found that 9.6 million U.S. adults are highly myopic, or severely nearsighted, and of those, nearly 820,000 have a degenerative form of the disease and more than 41,000 suffer myopic choroidal neovascularization, a complication that can cause long-term vision loss, especially in women.

MIND Institute researcher studies feasibility of community providers training parents of children with autism

June 22, 2016

Research has long shown that parent-implemented “naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions,” which are applied in a child’s usual setting and designed to build developmentally appropriate skills, help decrease the main symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, parent training by community providers had not previously been studied.

Mothers with diabetes, other metabolic conditions, more likely to also have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

June 17, 2016

Mothers of children with autism who were diagnosed with metabolic conditions during pregnancy, particularly gestational and type 2 diabetes, were more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies in their blood compared to healthy women of children with autism. The presence of these anti-fetal brain autoantibodies has been previously found to be specific to some mothers of children with autism and rare among mothers of children without autism, researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found.

UC Davis study finds antibiotics increase availability of nutrients in the gut, enabling growth of pathogens

June 15, 2016

Research led by Andreas Bäumler, professor of medical immunology and microbiology at UC Davis Health System, has identified a new mechanism explaining how antibiotics change the gut microbiota, increasing nutrients that benefit the growth of pathogens, like Salmonella.

UC Davis establishes research center to tackle pain epidemic

June 13, 2016

Leveraging the vast expertise of scholars and scientists in medicine, nursing and other health science disciplines, UC Davis has established the Center for Advancing Pain Relief.

NIH funding for dermatology research trending downward for women and MDs

June 9, 2016

In a retrospective study of dermatology research awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 2009 to 2014, a team of UC Davis researchers found a significant decline in women investigators and a striking reduction in MD-only investigator funding dollars.

Risk of autism with intellectual disability linked with maternal immune dysfunction during pregnancy

June 7, 2016

Pregnant women with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, proteins that control communication between cells of the immune system, may be at significantly greater risk of having a child with autism combined with intellectual disability, researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found.

Lung cancer patients who have surgery live longer

June 7, 2016

Patients with late-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have surgery have better survival rates than those who don’t, but fewer of these patients are undergoing surgery, UC Davis researchers have found.

May 2016arrow

MIND Institute study examines development of school-age children with autism spectrum disorder

May 27, 2016

Grade school is an important period in children’s development, when they begin to mature and prepare to enter adolescence. Now, researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute hope to discover how to maximize that growth among children with autism to help them learn and thrive.

Inhaled silver particles end up in the brain, UC Davis study shows

May 26, 2016

Airborne silver nanoparticles that are common in occupational settings travel from the nose to the brain, where they can remain for weeks and trigger an immune response linked with injury, UC Davis researchers studying adult rats have found.

Miglioretti awarded $7.5 million to evaluate supplemental breast imaging

May 25, 2016

Diana Miglioretti, UC Davis dean’s professor of biostatistics and an internationally recognized breast cancer screening expert, has received $7.5 million to determine the effectiveness of two supplemental breast screening and diagnostic workup strategies -- digital breast tomosynthesis (3D mammography) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -- used with mammography for cancer detection. Miglioretti’s team also will work to determine whether effectiveness of the screening strategies depends on a woman’s breast density.

UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center establishes new Cognitive Neurosciences Fellowship

May 25, 2016

The UC Davis Alzheimer’s Disease Center has established a new, integrated translational cognitive neuroscience postdoctoral fellowship program through a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Institute on Aging.

Calcium channels team up to activate excitable cells

May 18, 2016

Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate excitable cells such as neurons and muscle cells, researchers with UC Davis Health System and the University of Washington have found.

Physicians can counsel patients to prevent gun violence, experts say

May 17, 2016

It is not illegal for physicians to ask their patients about firearms, counsel them as they would on any other health matter, and disclose that information to third parties when necessary, according to a review of the literature by physicians at UC Davis, Brown University, and the University of Colorado who are helping to lead the effort to prevent firearm-related injuries in the U.S.

UC Davis researchers identify new metabolic disorder

May 12, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis have identified a new metabolic disorder that affects newborns and leads to death hours after their birth. Identification of the genetic defect has meant the delivery of a healthy newborn to a mother who earlier had lost two other newborns to the condition.

More research needed to identify and measure quality of autism interventions

May 10, 2016

With the dramatic rise of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the numbers and types of interventions promoted to families and individuals with autism have surged as well.

Device worn on eyeglasses offers hope for people with low vision

May 5, 2016

A miniature camera using optical character-recognition technology, mounted onto the eyeglasses of people who are considered legally blind, dramatically improves their ability to read an email, newspaper article, menu or page in a book, a study by researchers with UC Davis Health System.

UC Davis teams receive prestigious CITRIS awards for innovation in human health

May 4, 2016

Three UC Davis Health System teams have been selected from among 54 highly competitive proposals to receive awards to develop innovative information technology solutions in human health care from the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society — CITRIS — a collaboration of the UC campuses at Berkeley, Davis, Merced and Santa Cruz. The grants are awarded in collaboration with the Banatao Institute founded by high-tech entrepreneur and philanthropist Dado Banatao.  

Autism and cancer share a remarkable number of risk genes in common

May 3, 2016

Autism and cancer share more than 40 risk genes, suggesting that common mechanisms underlying the functions of some of these genes could conceivably be leveraged to develop therapies not just for cancer but for autism as well, an extensive assessment by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center has found.

Antibiotics allow gut pathogens to breathe

May 2, 2016

Antibiotics are essential for fighting bacterial infection, but, paradoxically, they can also make the body more prone to infection and diarrhea. Research led by Andreas Bäumler, professor of medical immunology and microbiology at UC Davis Health System, has identified the chain of events that occur within the gut lumen after antibiotic treatment that allow “bad” bugs to flourish.

Common supplement boosts kidney cancer therapy

May 2, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid commonly found in fish and fish oil supplements, reduces renal cell carcinoma invasiveness, growth rate, and blood vessel growth when combined with the anti-cancer therapy regorafenib. The study was published in the May issue of the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.

Targeted hepatitis B virus screening effective in addressing infection, liver disease risk

May 2, 2016

A community-based hepatitis B virus screening effort led by UC Davis researchers found that targeted outreach to Asian American populations can identify groups at high risk for infection and direct them to appropriate follow-up care to help prevent the onset of liver diseases, including cancer.

April 2016arrow

Stem cell research reveals myelin repair capacity

April 28, 2016

In a study published today in Cell Reports, Wenbin Deng and his colleagues present data showing that immature astroglial transplants, derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are highly protective against white matter brain injury — which can occur from lack of oxygen following a stroke or in childbirth — and can improve spatial learning and memory function in mouse models.

Distance language intervention helps adolescents with disabilities communicate

April 27, 2016

Sean Sawicki, who has fragile X syndrome, can be hard to understand and doesn’t always have the attention span to carry on a sustained conversation. But a novel intervention developed by UC Davis MIND Institute researchers seems to be making a difference.

SU2C awards Albeck Innovative Research Grant

April 26, 2016

UC Davis molecular biologist John Albeck is among 10 recipients chosen to receive a 2016 Innovative Research Grant (IRG) from Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C), a non-profit that supports innovative, high-risk, high-reward projects to accelerate the pace of cancer research and give patients access to new therapies as quickly as possible.

Weighing the pros and cons of mental-health apps

April 26, 2016

“There’s an app for that.” The phrase is so ubiquitous it’s a meme, and trademarked by Apple Inc.

New study tests stem cells as a treatment for degenerative disc disease

April 25, 2016

As part of a new multicenter clinical trial, UC Davis Health System researchers will test whether a novel stem cell treatment can reduce the pain and mobility issues caused by degenerative disc disease.

UC Davis MIND Institute joins SPARK, nation's largest autism research study

April 21, 2016

The UC Davis MIND Institute in Sacramento, Calif. today helped launch SPARK, an online research initiative designed to become the largest autism study ever undertaken in the United States. Sponsored by the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI), SPARK will collect information and DNA for genetic analysis from 50,000 individuals with autism — and their families — to advance our understanding of the causes of this condition and to hasten the discovery of supports and treatments. [español]

International Cancer Genome Consortium for Medicine launch announced

April 17, 2016

The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) today announced plans to launch of the International Cancer Genome Consortium for Medicine (ICGCmed), a new phase in the consortium’s evolution that will link genomics to clinical information and health.

Use of clot-blocking device should be rare, UC Davis study finds

April 13, 2016

Devices intended to stop potentially deadly blood clots from reaching the lungs can help a small portion of the patients who receive them but can also increase the risk of additional clots, researchers at UC Davis Health System have found.

Radiation improves survival in older patients with soft tissue sarcomas

April 11, 2016

UC Davis researchers have shown that radiation therapy following surgery benefits older patients more than their younger counterparts, a surprising finding that could change the way some patients are treated for soft tissue sarcomas (STS).

Behavioral Health Center of Excellence holds seminar on Firearm Violence and Mental Illness

April 7, 2016

Each year in the United States, firearm violence results in approximately 30,000 deaths and 75,000 nonfatal injuries to patients seen in hospital emergency rooms. Garen Wintemute, internationally renowned director of the Violence Prevention Research Program at UC Davis Health System, will discuss “Firearm Violence and Mental Illness.”

Whites receive more state funding for autism services than other racial/ethnic groups

April 4, 2016

Whites with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in California receive more state funding than Hispanics, African Americans, Asians and others, new research from UC Davis Health System has found. The study also showed that spending on ASD increases dramatically with age. [en español]

March 2016arrow

Cancer gene twice as likely to be defective in children with autism

March 30, 2016

A large study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found that a gene whose role is to suppress cellular damage from environmental stressors is nearly twice as likely to be defective in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and that the deficit is also present in their fathers.

Vascular brain injury is evident in people in their 40s

March 28, 2016

A large, multicenter study led by the UC Davis School of Medicine for the first time has shown that people as young as their 40s have stiffening of the arteries that is associated with subtle structural damage to the brain that is implicated in cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease later in life.

New target makes end run against therapy-resistant prostate cancer

March 28, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth.

Hispanics with dementia receive antipsychotic medications at twice the rate of non-Hispanics

March 24, 2016

Antipsychotic medications are prescribed to Hispanics with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias at higher rates than non-Hispanic whites, for dementia-related mental-health symptoms such as depression, anxiety and aggression, a UC Davis study conducted using data from a large and diverse population of elderly dementia patients has found.

Cells sensing hostile takeover by pathogens also sound alarm to alert immune system

March 23, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis have discovered an unexpected link between how the immune system sounds an alarm when its cells are taken over by pathogens during an infection and how an inflammatory response is triggered. The finding of this novel link, published in the journal Nature on March 23, is important because it helps researchers understand how a cell senses bacterial or viral infection, and how these pathways are linked to inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

Heavy, persistent pot use linked to economic and social problems at midlife

March 23, 2016

A research study that followed children from birth up to age 38 has found that people who smoked cannabis four or more days of the week over many years ended up in a lower social class than their parents, with lower-paying, less skilled and less prestigious jobs than those who were not regular cannabis smokers. [en español]

Targeted interview technique could help doctors improve patient outcomes

March 21, 2016

New UC Davis Health System research shows that physicians can quickly and easily use a directed communication approach known as SEE IT (or Self-Efficacy Enhancing Interviewing Techniques) that is designed to boost patient confidence in managing chronic disease symptoms and increase the likelihood that they will make healthy changes that improve outcomes.

State stem cell agency approves research funding for UC Davis scientists

March 21, 2016

Two new UC Davis research efforts, one aimed at addressing fatal early childhood conditions known as Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease, the other designed to develop an immunotherapy that would eradicate solid tumor cancer stem cells and create sustained anti-tumor effects, have been approved for funding by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

School of Medicine again ranked among nation's best

March 16, 2016

Once again, U.S. News & World Report has ranked UC Davis School of Medicine among America's best medical schools for the quality of its educational programs in primary care and research.

Human stem cells target Huntington's disease

March 15, 2016

In a promising finding for research into Huntington’s disease (HD) — the devastating inherited neurodegenerative disorder — a team of UC Davis investigators has identified for the first time a way to use human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to deliver the key brain protein growth factor that is dramatically diminished by Huntington’s disease.

UC Davis environmental health researcher receives grant for DDT study

March 4, 2016

UC Davis environmental scientist Michele La Merrill is among five exceptional early-career scientists receiving grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) for research on how substances in the environment could harm human health.